wetheurban:

ART: 19-Year-Old Sleep Paralysis Victim Recreates His Visions in Stunning Surreal Photographs

Conceptual photographer Nicolas Bruno has suffered from sleep paralysis since he was 15.

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Reblogged from WeTheUrban

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Amazing 3D Street Art by Julian Beever

English artist Julian Beever is considered a leading chalk artist in sidewalk art. He’s also (clearly with good reason) called Pavement Picasso.

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Reblogged from WeTheUrban

wetheurban:

FASHION: Iris Van Herpen Fall/Winter 2014

The artist Lawrence Malstaf, a specialist in the interaction between biology and physicality, collaborated with Iris Van Herpen on an installation that had models suspended in the air in what looked like oversized plastic bags with accordion shaped hoses running down the sides.

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Reblogged from WeTheUrban
theparisreview:

“It’s a good thing that there are still a few of us who never grow up.” 
Sadie Stein on Los Angeles, veritable Rohmers, and characters getting together.

theparisreview:

“It’s a good thing that there are still a few of us who never grow up.” 

Sadie Stein on Los Angeles, veritable Rohmers, and characters getting together.

Reblogged from The Paris Review

explore-blog:

Hacktivist, a graphic novel by Alyssa Milano exploring privacy and social justice through a story of friendship and freedom at a time of war. Read more about it here, then complement with these 10 masterpieces of graphic nonfiction and a very different take on the female-graphic-novel-protagonist concept in this graphic gem inspired by Jane Eyre.  

(Thanks, Chel)

Reblogged from Explore
theparisreview:

For many years until his death in 1997, the great American publisher James Laughlin maintained a manila file folder labeled “Handspring.” Here is an example.

theparisreview:

For many years until his death in 1997, the great American publisher James Laughlin maintained a manila file folder labeled “Handspring.” Here is an example.

Reblogged from The Paris Review

mucholderthen:

Grazina Grei [greimana]
Klaipeda, Lithuania 

  1. Earths magnetic fields interacting with sun
  2. Lunar eclipse 
  3. Solar eclipse 
Reblogged from Δ S > 0
visualizingmath:

The Greatest Mathematicians of All Time by StudyGeek

The greatest mathematicians have shaped our understanding of the world and fueled the progression of modern life and society. It is difficult to say which mathematicians truly were the greatest, though the most famous list of mathematicians always includes the most original and compelling thinkers – these are people who have helped significantly in our understanding of nature.

StudyGeek.org is a free website full of free math lessons, math vocabulary, educational videos, games, math solvers, and wonderful infographics!

visualizingmath:

The Greatest Mathematicians of All Time by StudyGeek

The greatest mathematicians have shaped our understanding of the world and fueled the progression of modern life and society. It is difficult to say which mathematicians truly were the greatest, though the most famous list of mathematicians always includes the most original and compelling thinkers – these are people who have helped significantly in our understanding of nature.

StudyGeek.org is a free website full of free math lessons, math vocabulary, educational videos, games, math solvers, and wonderful infographics!

Reblogged from Δ S > 0
theparisreview:

“As one walks through the three rooms, spread across two separate but adjacent sites, the accumulative effect of Avşar’s vision is powerful: the artworks peak between each other in rich rhymes and deeply felt themes and variations, fusing into a moving vision full of quiet but firm political engagement and profound metaphysical thought.”
Rowan Ricardo Phillips on Vahap Avşar’s exhibition “Black Album,” currently on view at Istanbul’s Rampa Gallery.

theparisreview:

“As one walks through the three rooms, spread across two separate but adjacent sites, the accumulative effect of Avşar’s vision is powerful: the artworks peak between each other in rich rhymes and deeply felt themes and variations, fusing into a moving vision full of quiet but firm political engagement and profound metaphysical thought.”

Rowan Ricardo Phillips on Vahap Avşar’s exhibition “Black Album,” currently on view at Istanbul’s Rampa Gallery.

Reblogged from The Paris Review

"In high school, Fred was president of the Inter-racial Cross Section Committee. He was not just a leader of Blacks but whites as well. Fred became leader of the youth NAACP at the age of 17, fighting for jobs, better recreation facilities, open housing. He led demonstrations for a swimming pool in Maywood.
Fred attended Triton College, Malcolm X College, and University of Illinois Circle Campus pursuing a pre-law course of studies. So Fred had become very busy—he had worked in groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), he met people like Stokely Carmichael, Dr. Ralph Abernathy, Jesse Jackson, Dick Gregory and various other people.
After Fred left the youth NAACP and SNCC and started doing things in the Maywood community, he joined the Illinois Black Panther and they chose him as their chairman. While he was chairman, the Illinois Black Panthers were organizing free medical centers, free breakfast programs, free clothing and free busing to prison programs.
Fred told the people to fight for their rights by any means necessary. He was organizing hospital strikes. He also founded what he called the Rainbow Coalition of poor whites, Blacks, Latinos, Indians and Chicanos in the city of Chicago to fight against oppression.
Fred took the Young Lords, a Puerto Rican gang, and the Young Patriots, a white gang from the Uptown area, and made all these groups into a political organization because he was trying to get them to see that racism wasn’t the only problem—that racism was a byproduct of capitalism. He was going to take these groups to wipe out capitalism and oppression.
During the trial, it was shown that the police and FBI were trying to get the gangs against the Panthers because the Panthers were trying to unite the gangs to fight against their oppression.”
Socialist Worker, “The Murder of Fred Hampton”

"In high school, Fred was president of the Inter-racial Cross Section Committee. He was not just a leader of Blacks but whites as well. Fred became leader of the youth NAACP at the age of 17, fighting for jobs, better recreation facilities, open housing. He led demonstrations for a swimming pool in Maywood.

Fred attended Triton College, Malcolm X College, and University of Illinois Circle Campus pursuing a pre-law course of studies. So Fred had become very busy—he had worked in groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), he met people like Stokely Carmichael, Dr. Ralph Abernathy, Jesse Jackson, Dick Gregory and various other people.

After Fred left the youth NAACP and SNCC and started doing things in the Maywood community, he joined the Illinois Black Panther and they chose him as their chairman. While he was chairman, the Illinois Black Panthers were organizing free medical centers, free breakfast programs, free clothing and free busing to prison programs.

Fred told the people to fight for their rights by any means necessary. He was organizing hospital strikes. He also founded what he called the Rainbow Coalition of poor whites, Blacks, Latinos, Indians and Chicanos in the city of Chicago to fight against oppression.

Fred took the Young Lords, a Puerto Rican gang, and the Young Patriots, a white gang from the Uptown area, and made all these groups into a political organization because he was trying to get them to see that racism wasn’t the only problem—that racism was a byproduct of capitalism. He was going to take these groups to wipe out capitalism and oppression.

During the trial, it was shown that the police and FBI were trying to get the gangs against the Panthers because the Panthers were trying to unite the gangs to fight against their oppression.”

Socialist Worker, “The Murder of Fred Hampton”

See I gotta draw the line, I can’t take it no more
If you ain’t down with revolution, what you waiting for?
Making money for suckers and our communities poor
Ripping flags off of coffins, man, this ain’t our war
Colonized and terrorized by the world’s biggest killers
The US government, the biggest weapon and drug dealers
Filling prisons with children, incarcerating the future
Myspace and Facebook got us stuck on computers
Stuck on stupid bumping music that’s abusive to the shorties
And the nonsense that you spitting, they just listen and absorb it
I’ve been dormant, I’ve awoken, I’m a giant, I’m ready
I’m with the APPO in Oaxaca and we holding machetes

I rock hard like Palestinian children holding slingshots!
I’m with every single kid that’s down for hip hop
For the culture, the life, what it really stands for
This music is resistance, it’s the voice of the poor
I’m on the side of the workers, the teachers, and lunch ladies
On the streets with brown mommies raising our brown babies
I’m with youth organizers cleaning up the Bronx river
I’m like Jaime Escalante when I stand and deliver
I’m with Evo Morales, man, he running Bolivia
Distribution of the land so we could all live bigger
I’m with Hugo and Fidel, Grandmaster and Melle Mel
I’m with the Panthers up in Queens, justice for Sean Bell
I’m with Camacho Negrón, I’m with Ojeda Ríos
Freedom for Oscar Lopez, time to get an appeal
I’m with Abu-Jamal, I’m with Assata Shakur
I’m with the compas in Immokalee getting a penny more!

[…]

I’m with Elvira Arellano, I’m with Rudy Lozano
I’m for a world without borders and a better tomorrow
I’m with Mothers on the Move, I’m with sistas on the rise
I’m with La Peña del Bronx, keeping culture alive
I’m with the kids at the Batey, watching a beat battle
Mean mugging all these yuppies in shorts and brown sandals
I’m with parents everywhere fighting for good schools
And for all these good women to find some good dudes
I’m with Salvador Allende, I’m Super Anti Momio!
Con el pueblo en la Havana grito Viva Cuba Cono!
For immigrants, activists, unions, and freelancers
For DJs, MCs, bombers, and breakdancers
I’m with editors, engineers, Indymedia
I’m with my family and my crew, Rebel Diaz
I’m with DJ Disco Wiz, a Latino pioneer
Cause it’s dope when the elders break bread with the kids

I’m for telling the truth, exposing the lies
Think about the dead soldiers when you’re driving your ride
Them people died for the oil and Daddy Bush’s revenge
I’m with the widows, the children, and the lonely best friends
I’m with Families Stayin’ Together as ONE
I’m not for the raids and the deportations!
I’m with Victor Toro and the M.I.R
So watch out for those snitches in that unmarked car!
And for Lil Saulito, we gonna fight for your moms
So we gonna shout her out, twice in one song
I’m for twelve million workers and Elvira Arellano

Rebel Diaz 

Music is powerful. Let it be your revolution too. 

(via america-wakiewakie)

Reblogged from Ⓐnarcho Queer

Lucid Stead by Phillip K. Smith, III. Photo: Steve King.

Now here’s a little weekend inspiration. “Lucid Stead” is an art installation by Phillip K. Smith, III in the beautiful desert landscape of Joshua Tree in California.

With some mirrors, LED lights, custom built electronic equipment, and Arduino programming, Smith transformed a 70-year-old homesteader shack into an architecture piece that complements and contrasts with its peaceful environment throughout the entire day.
bustler.net

All images courtesy of Phillip K. Smith, III; photographers: Steve King, Lance Gerber, Lou Mora 

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via: http://archinect.com/news/article/87167241/lucid-stead-by-artist-phillip-k-smith-iii-illuminates-joshua-tree-california